Home » Culture & Art » National Geographic Opens The Tomb of King Tutankhamun
Culture & Art

National Geographic Opens The Tomb of King Tutankhamun

shutterstock_348421580
Ceyda Arınç
Ceyda Arınç
06/04/2016
0 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 LinkedIn 0 0 Flares ×

Egypt Pharaoh, King Tutankhamun’s Tomb and the mysteries behind the walls are about to be discovered by Nat Geo teams. The special documentary containing all the details of the investigation is also being prepared for Nat Geo.

PERMITTED USE: This image may be downloaded or is otherwise provided at no charge for one-time use for coverage or promotion of National Geographic News, Tut's Tomb and exclusively in conjunction thereof.  No copying, distribution or archiving permitted.  Sublicensing, sale or resale is prohibited.   REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption, which makes reference to National Geographic.  Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing National Geographic are subject to paid licensing. Photo Credit to include with image use: Kenneth Garrett/ National Geographic/ Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities 05-tut-scan: Technicians move the radar unit along a specially designed track at the base of the western wall. The baboons represent the hours of darkness the dead must pass through to reach the next world.

Kenneth Garrett/ National Geographic/ Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities

Following the British archaeologist Nicholas Reeves’ theory, the tomb of Tutankhamun went through 2 days of radar scan and it’s been speculated that a hidden tomb belonging to Nefertiti, King Tut’s mother-in-law, resides in the unopened sections. Radar scans have never been conducted within the tomb before, with National Geographic efforts, a documentary of the research process will be documented.

Kenneth Garrett/ National Geographic/ Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities  

Kenneth Garrett/ National Geographic/ Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities

Khaled El-Enany, the Egyptian antiquities minister, announced in Cairo that radar scans on the walls have revealed the hidden chambers along with unidentified objects which seemed to be composed of metal and organic materials.
Kenneth Garrett/ National Geographic/ Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities

Kenneth Garrett/ National Geographic/ Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities

Though there’s no hard evidence for the theory yet, El-Enany says; they cannot talk about results now and; ‘at least a week will be needed to analyze the data, which has been sent to experts in both Egypt and the United States.’

Related Posts
Is there anything you want to add?
*



0 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 LinkedIn 0 0 Flares ×